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What are some metaphors to describe personality?

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Some metaphors to describe personality could involve referring to people as the type of animals that their behavior resembles, such as a pig for messy people or a dragon for angry or harsh people. Describing someone's personality as "bubbly" is generally taken to mean that they are enthusiastic or fun to be around.

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Personalities can also be likened to inanimate objects, which is particularly effective for describing sedentary or emotionless people, as in the case of a "couch potato" or a "rock" respectively.

The words "cold" and "distant" are often used as metaphors for personality, both of which are widely understood to mean that a person is emotionally aloof.

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