Q:

What was the name of Noah's wife?

A:

Quick Answer

The Bible does not give the name of Noah's wife, but in Jewish tradition, her name is Naamah. In Greek tradition, her name is Doris.

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Full Answer

In the flood story of Genesis, she is referred to only as "Noah's wife." "Naamah" from Jewish tradition is the sister of Tubal-cain (descendant of Cain) and the daughter of Lamech and Zillah. Her name means "the pleasant one" or "the beautiful one" and is thought to reflect how Cainites (Gnostics who venerated Cain) chose wives based on looks instead of character.

In the Book of Jubilees, she is called Emzara, daughter of Rake'el (son of Methuselah).

The ancient Greeks called her Doris, and Noah was called Nereus.

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