Q:

Where does the phrase "health is better than wealth" come from?

A:

Quick Answer

The phrase "health is better than wealth" is an old Irish proverb that originates from the Gaelic language. According to Compass Rose Cultural Crossroads, the original words were "Is fearr an tsláinte ná na táinte."

Know More
Where does the phrase "health is better than wealth" come from?
Credit: esemelwe E+ Getty Images

Full Answer

Proverbs are called "seanfhocail" in Irish, which means "old words." The message of this proverb is that it is better to be healthy than rich. The English have also used this proverb for many years. Proverbs originate from verses or ancestors who pass down wise words of advice over the generations, and the meaning can alter over the years.

Learn more about Philosophy

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the origin of the phrase "you are a gentleman and a scholar"?

    A:

    The phrase "You are a gentleman and a scholar" most likely originated in England in the 18th century. During this time period, scholarly pursuits and noble manners were seen as important characteristics among men.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some steps to take to become a better person?

    A:

    To be a better person, one should take the following steps: he should practice gratitude, stop being defensive, practice acceptance, forgive without holding resentments, be authentic, be empathetic, be direct, be kind and compassionate, have integrity and love himself, according to Huffington Post. In addition, one has to consider the impact of his actions to others, and always think before speaking.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    From which Bible verse does "this too shall pass" come?

    A:

    The phrase "this too shall pass" is not found in the Bible, although it sounds like a helpful scripture. One reason why some people believe it is from the Bible is because it reinforces a pre-existing belief, and attributing it to the Bible helps to legitimize it.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is an example of kairos?

    A:

    An example of kairos occurs in Act 3, scene 2 of William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" when Marc Antony seizes the opportunity to give a speech over Julius Caesar's corpse. Kairos is a rhetorical term that refers to the opportune moment to make a particular speech.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore