Q:

When is a will read?

A:

There is no legal requirement for a formal reading of a will, reports estate planning attorney Julie Ann Garber for About.com. Estate attorneys determine who should receive a copy of the will under the law and who should receive a copy even if not required by state law.

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Garber notes that several parties should receive a copy of the will, including the executor or executrix, any named beneficiaries and heirs, the accountant for the estate and the IRS and other tax agencies. Wills become matters of public record once they are filed in court, except in rare situations in which a probate judge seals the documents.

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