Q:

What is routine decision making?

A:

Quick Answer

Routine decision making is a system or process used to make decisions that are consistent or lacking in involvement. Decisions that people make on a daily basis and that require little research or time investment are often considered routine.

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Full Answer

In a business, decisions to purchase new inventory when supplies run low is relatively routine since it is something the company does often and is necessary for operations. In contrast, a major investment in a new building or asset is normally not routine, since it is irregular and highly involved. The more a person knows about a particular domain or topic, the more likely it is for repetitive decisions to become routine.

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  • Q:

    What is Greek Rationalism?

    A:

    Greek rationalism deals with trying to understand the world using logic and observation. While non-Greek contemporaries had similar ideas, Greek philosophy formed the basis for Western rationalism. Greek rationalist philosophy is still taught.

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  • Q:

    Which of the following is an example of false cause and effect?

    A:

    One example of false cause and effect is using the scientific observation that increased temperature correlates with increased pressure to make the assumption that temperature causes pressure. Another example is observing that the speed of a windmill is faster when the wind is faster and assuming that the windmill is the cause of the faster wind.

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  • Q:

    What are examples of unsound and invalid arguments?

    A:

    An example of an invalid argument is: "All ceilings are attached to walls. All doors are attached to walls. Therefore, all doors are ceilings." An example of a valid but unsound argument is: "All dogs are green. Anything that is green is a fish. Therefore, all dogs are fish."

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  • Q:

    What is an example of illogical reasoning?

    A:

    One of the most common examples of illogical reasoning is the straw man argument, which often entails either isolating a particular part of an argument before then presenting it as an entirely individual or separate position, or using a very early form of a theory to support a case while ignoring the fully developed theory itself (attacking Darwinism using only Darwin's work as a source for example, ignores all the progress made since, so is not valid). Finding a source that offers an extreme view or unrealistic account of a position, then treating it as fact, is also a straw man argument

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