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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cask_of_Amontillado

The story's narrator, Montresor, tells an unspecified person, who knows him very well, of the day he took his revenge on Fortunato (Italian for "the fortunate one"), a fellow nobleman. Angry over numerous injuries and some unspecified insult, Montresor plots to murder his "friend" during Carnival, while the man is drunk, dizzy, ...

www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/p/poes-short-stories/summary-and-analysis/the-cask-of-amontillado

The first-person narrator, whom we later discover to be named Montresor, announces immediately that someone named Fortunato has injured him repeatedly and has recently insulted him. Montresor can stand no more; he vows revenge upon Fortunato. The remainder of the story deals with Montresor's methods of ...

www.sparknotes.com/lit/poestories/section11

Summary. The narrator, Montresor, opens the story by stating that he has been irreparably insulted by his acquaintance, Fortunato, and that he seeks revenge. He wants to exact this revenge, however, in a measured way, without placing himself at risk. He decides to use Fortunato's fondness for wine against him. During the ...

www.shmoop.com/cask-of-amontillado/fortunato.html

At first glance, Fortunato seems easier to identify with than Montresor. It's much simpler to relate to the victim than to the victimizer. But, in some ways, he seems even more foreign to the reader than Montresor. Part of this is because Montresor is telling us the story, and he doesn't give us much information on his prey.

www.enotes.com/homework-help/what-may-insult-that-fortunato-did-montresor-41029

The insult is never named, or rather the "thousand injuries" were never named by Fortunato. We know that Montresor is an unreliable narrator because he never names the insults and his account of the entire story is so one-sided he cannot be entirely believed. Montresor tells the reader that he's tried to hide his true ...

www.enotes.com/homework-help/yes-for-love-god-what-montresor-mean-amontillado-89995

It is to be noted that Fortunato does not call Montresor by name except at the end when he cries, "For the love of God, Montresor!" Poe's main purpose for writing this line was to show that Fortunato understood what was happening and who was responsible. Montresor specifies that one of the requirements for perfect ...

www.enotes.com/homework-help/cask-amontillado-why-does-montresor-say-fortunado-103269

Rather than sarcasm, it is a more sophisticated form of verbal irony. Although the two are closely related, all verbal irony is not sarcasm. Here, Montresor is responding to Fortunato's pleas for help, but not in the way Fortunato wants. Instead, Montresor is telling him of all the pain, punishment, and inequality of the world in ...

xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/poe/cask.html

THE thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as I best could, but when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge. You, who so well know the nature of my soul, will not suppose, however, that gave utterance to a threat. At length I would be avenged; this was a point definitely, settled --but the very definitiveness with which it ...

www.enotes.com/homework-help/what-happens-fortunato-cask-armontillado-115011

Your question might concern what may have happened to Fortunato after Montresor walled him up in the niche and left him there. Naturally Fortunato would have died, but some writers have assumed that he died immediately of suffocation while others have assumed that he died of starvation. I believe it was Poe's intention ...