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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cask_of_Amontillado

The story's narrator, Montresor, tells an unspecified person, who knows him very well, of the day he took his revenge on Fortunato (Italian for "the fortunate one"), a fellow nobleman. Angry over numerous injuries and some unspecified insult, Montresor plots to murder his "friend" during Carnival, while the man is drunk, dizzy, ...

www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/p/poes-short-stories/summary-and-analysis/the-cask-of-amontillado

The first-person narrator, whom we later discover to be named Montresor, announces immediately that someone named Fortunato has injured him repeatedly and has recently insulted him. Montresor can stand no more; he vows revenge upon Fortunato. The remainder of the story deals with Montresor's methods of ...

www.shmoop.com/cask-of-amontillado/fortunato.html

At first glance, Fortunato seems easier to identify with than Montresor. It's much simpler to relate to the victim than to the victimizer. But, in some ways, he seems even more foreign to the reader than Montresor. Part of this is because Montresor is telling us the story, and he doesn't give us much information on his prey.

www.shmoop.com/cask-of-amontillado/foil.html

Foil. Character Role Analysis. Fortunato and Montresor. A foil is a pair of characters that compliment and contrast with each other in ways that deepen the story. Poe was very fond of this device, and it shows up in many, if not all of his stories, most notably, "William Wilson." In “The Cask,” we find a classic foil in Fortunato and ...

www.sparknotes.com/lit/poestories/section11.rhtml

The narrator, Montresor, opens the story by stating that he has been irreparably insulted by his acquaintance, Fortunato, and that he seeks revenge. He wants to exact this revenge, however, in a measured way, without placing himself at risk. He decides to use Fortunato's fondness for wine against him. During the carnival  ...

www.enotes.com/homework-help/what-may-insult-that-fortunato-did-montresor-41029

The insult is never named, or rather the "thousand injuries" were never named by Fortunato. We know that Montresor is an unreliable narrator because he never names the insults and his account of the entire story is so one-sided he cannot be entirely believed. Montresor tells the reader that he's tried to hide his true ...

www.enotes.com/homework-help/yes-for-love-god-what-montresor-mean-amontillado-89995

It is to be noted that Fortunato does not call Montresor by name except at the end when he cries, "For the love of God, Montresor!" Poe's main purpose for writing this line was to show that Fortunato understood what was happening and who was responsible. Montresor specifies that one of the requirements for perfect ...

xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/poe/cask.html

THE thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as I best could, but when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge. You, who so well know the nature of my soul, will not suppose, however, that gave utterance to a threat. At length I would be avenged; this was a point definitely, settled --but the very definitiveness with which it ...

americanenglish.state.gov/files/ae/resource_files/the_cask_of_amontillado.pdf

foRTunaTo had huRT me a thousand times and I had suffered quietly. But then I learned that he had laughed at my proud name,. Montresor, the name of an old and honored family. I promised myself that I would make him pay for this — that I would have revenge. You must not suppose, however, that I spoke of this to.