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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_year

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year .... The Roman calendar originated as a lunisolar calendar and named many of its days after the syzygies of the moon: the new moon (Kalendae or ...

www.history.com/news/ask-history/why-do-we-have-leap-year

Feb 19, 2014 ... Nearly every four years, we add an extra day to the calendar in the form of February 29, also known as Leap Day. Put simply, these additiona...

news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/02/160226-leap-year-science-time-world-cultures-february

Feb 26, 2016 ... The ancient Egyptians did it, and so do we. Here's how a leap day—which occurs Februrary 29—helps keep our calendars and societies in ...

www.thoughtco.com/history-of-leap-year-1989846

Sep 28, 2017 ... Julius Caesar was behind the origins of a leap year to allow the Roman yearly calendar keep pace with the actual rotation of the earth around ...

www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/29/leap-year-2012-science-february-29-video_n_1309996.html

Feb 29, 2012 ... Leap Year was “invented” back in the first century BC, when Julius Caesar and his team of astronomers noticed that their 355-day Roman ...

www.timeanddate.com/date/leapyear.html

Feb 29, 2016 ... A leap year has 366 days, as opposed to a common year, which has 365. We add a leap day – February 29 – nearly every four years.

www.infoplease.com/leap-year-explained

Learn what leap year is and why we need it. The Gregorian calendar, which now serves as the standard calendar for civil use throughout the world, has both ...

time.com/4237292/leap-year-leap-day-history

Feb 29, 2016 ... The phrase “leap year,” which probably refers to the jump in days of the week—a calendar date usually moves forward one day of the week per ...

www.dictionary.com/e/leap-year

Even though the standard calendar year is 365 days, the Earth actually takes 365 days 5 hours 48 minutes and 46 seconds to go completely around the sun.