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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarsaparilla_(soft_drink)

History[edit]. Two historical Sioux City sarsaparilla bottles, as used in retail sale for decades by Sioux City brand from United States, until the 2010s. Sarsaparilla was popular in the United States in the 19th century. According to advertisements for patent medicines of the period, it was considered to be ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarsaparilla

Sarsaparilla may refer to: Biology[edit]. Several species of plants, of the genus Smilax, including: Smilax ornata, also known as Honduran or Jamaican sarsaparilla; Smilax aristolochiifolia, known as Mexican sarsaparilla; Smilax aspera, a flowering vine found worldwide; Smilax glyciphylla, sweet sarsaparilla, native to ...

www.ccba.bc.ca/discuss1/_disc1/00000a49.htm

May 29, 2003 ... History and Archeology of Sarsaparilla. Sarsaparilla did not become well-known until the 16th century. During these t imes Caribbean and North American Indians suggested its use as a treatment for va rious skin ailments, urinary problems and to help maintain ones' youth and energ y. Sarsaparilla root ...

www.livestrong.com/article/491829-sarsaparilla-vs-root-beer

The history of sassafras is a long one, and Native Americans have traditionally used the plant for a wide range of medicinal uses. Sassafras has been used as a spring tonic and blood purifier. The leaves were eaten raw or cooked, and the dried root was used for making tea. All parts of the sassafras tree contain a volatile ...

www.mdidea.com/products/proper/proper08804.html

Botanical Source and History of Sarsaparilla,Smilax root. Smilax sarsaparilla Smilax Aristolochiaefolia The Sarsaparillas are all climbing plants, having aculeate (prickly) stems; there are many species, but they do not all possess medicinal activity. Most of the drug-yielding species grow in the marshy forests of Mexico and ...

www.herbalpedia.com/blog/?p=111

Dec 1, 2011 ... History: The word Sarsaparilla comes from the Spanish Sarza, meaning a bramble, and parilla, a vine, in allusion to the thorny stems of the plant. The ancient Greeks and Romans considered European sarsaparilla an antidote to poisons. But the herb was not popular in herbal healing until the 16th century, ...

www.healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/sarsaparilla

History. History. For centuries, indigenous people around the world used the root of the sarsaparilla plant for treating joint problems like arthritis, and for healing skin problems like psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis. The root was also thought to cure leprosy due to its “blood-purifying” properties.

www.rain-tree.com/sarsaparilla.htm

European physicians considered sarsaparilla root a tonic, blood purifier, diuretic, and sweat promoter. A Smilax root from Mexico was introduced into European medicine in 1536, where it developed a strong following as a cure for syphilis and rheumatism. Since this time, Smilax roots have had a long history of use for ...

www.hbmag.com/sarsaparilla-a-cowboy-spring-tonic

Apr 26, 2008 ... Some History of the Tonic: American cowboys and ranchers in the 1800's learned of sarsaparilla from the Indian and Spanish peoples they worked with. The herb had been brought to Europe in the 16th century much earlier by returning Spanish soldiers as a cure for syphilis. This of course was not true; but ...