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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burn

A burn is a type of injury to skin, or other tissues, caused by heat, cold, electricity, chemicals, friction, or radiation. Most burns are due to heat from hot liquids, solids , or fire. While rates are similar for males and females the underlying causes often differ. Among women in some areas, risk is related to use of open cooking fires ...

www.healthline.com/health/burns

Apr 26, 2016 ... Burns are one of the most common household injuries, especially among children. The term “burn” means more than the burning sensation associated with this injury. Burns are characterized by severe skin damage that causes the affected skin cells to die. Most people can recover from burns without ...

www.healthline.com/health/home-remedies-for-burns

May 1, 2017 ... You can treat most first-degree burns and second-degree burns at home. Read on to learn which remedies are best for your skin, and which should be avoided.

www.uptodate.com/contents/skin-burns-beyond-the-basics

Jun 15, 2017 ... Skin burn injuries are common, with over one million burn injuries occurring every year in the United States. Skin burns can result from exposure to several possible sources, including hot water or steam, hot objects or flames, chemicals, electricity.

www.webmd.com/first-aid/tc/home-treatment-for-second-degree-burns-topic-overview

For many second-degree burns,home treatment is all that is needed for healing and to prevent other problems. Rinse the burn Rinse burned skin with cool water until the pain stops. Usually rinsing will stop the pain in 15 to 30 minutes. The cool water lowers the skin temperature and stops the burn from becoming more ...

www.webmd.com/pain-management/guide/pain-caused-by-burns

Apr 30, 2017 ... Second-degree burns (partial thickness burns) affect the epidermis and the dermis (lower layer of skin). They cause pain, redness, swelling, and blistering. Third-degree burns (full thickness burns) go through the dermis and affect deeper tissues. They result in white or blackened, charred skin that may be ...

medlineplus.gov/burns.html

Oct 4, 2017 ... Burns can cause swelling, blistering, scarring and, in serious cases, shock, and even death. They also can lead to infections because they damage your skin's protective barrier. Treatment for burns depends on the cause of the burn, how deep it is, and how much of the body it covers. Antibiotic creams can ...

www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/injured-skin/burns

First-degree burns are very common and frequently occur after one accidentally touches a hot stove, curling iron, or hair straightener. Sunburn can also be a first- degree burn. Unlike second- or third-degree burns, which are more severe, first- degree burns only involve the top layer of the skin. If you have a first-degree burn,  ...

www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-burns/basics/art-20056649

Jul 10, 2015 ... 1st-degree burn. A first-degree burn is the least serious type, involving only the outer layer of skin. It may cause: Redness; Swelling; Pain. You can usually treat a first-degree burn as a minor burn. If it involves much of the hands, feet, face, groin , buttocks or a major joint, seek emergency medical attention.