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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Profanity

Profanity is socially offensive language, which may also be called bad language, strong language, offensive language, crude language, coarse language, foul language, bad words, blasphemous language, vulgar language, lewd language, choice words or expletives. The use of such language is called swearing, cursing or ...

www.nytimes.com/2017/07/27/smarter-living/the-case-for-cursing.html

Jul 27, 2017 ... Swearing and cursing are often used interchangeably, but there's a subtle difference in their origins. A curse implies damning or punishing someone, while a swear word suggests blasphemy — invoking a deity to empower your words. For the sake of modern discussion, both words are defined as profanity: ...

time.com/4602680/profanity-research-why-we-swear

Dec 15, 2016 ... When researchers observed how people dealt with the pain of submerging their hands in icy water, they found that people could withstand more discomfort if they repeated a swear word, rather than a non-swear word. Scientists have also found that unlike most sounds we utter, cussing can happen in both ...

www.practiceofthepractice.com/swearing-cursing-cussing-profanity-is-it-ok-to-swear-with-your-clients-in-therapy

Sep 5, 2016 ... Swearing, Cursing, Cussing, Profanity: Is It Ok To Swear With Your Clients In Therapy? Swearing in therapy | Private Practice. I remember working in a substance abuse facility early in my career and my male counterpart was vehemently against the idea of swearing. His philosophy was something ...

qz.com/791736/a-linguists-love-letter-to-profanity-explains-why-its-fine-to-curse-around-kids

Sep 27, 2016 ... Conventional wisdom tells us that, despite its many benefits, swearing isn't a good idea around children. But then, it happens, invariably and internationally. One linguist, Benjamin Bergen, a professor of cognitive science at UC San Diego , who has studied swearing, reflected on the question of how it ...

www.scientificamerican.com/article/is-swearing-a-sign-of-a-limited-vocabulary

Apr 5, 2016 ... When words fail us, we curse. At least this is what the ... Swearing regularly and being able to generate a long list of curse words when prompted are very different. Indeed, the POV hypothesis could ... No doubt, Vidal could have unleashed a string of profanities at his aggressor. He surely had a mastery of ...

www.commonsensemedia.org/blog/5-ways-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-swearing-and-why

Parents can take advantage of these moments by explaining how shows (and other media) get attention for profanity -- a strategy that's part of selling a product. ... Maybe some of your kids' friends think cursing makes you cool, but the reality is that someone who curses a lot tends to look immature and not at all classy.

www.latimes.com/books/jacketcopy/la-et-jc-profane-books-20170809-story.html

Aug 9, 2017 ... It's not just your @#%& imagination: American books have gotten a lot more profane over the last six decades, according to a study led by a San Diego State University psychology professor. A team of scholars reports that there's been a “ dramatic” increase in curse words in American literature since 1950, ...

www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/why-swearing-makes-you-stronger

May 13, 2017 ... Melissa Mohr, the author of “Holy Sh*t: A Brief History of Swearing,” has noted that cursing can be a handy rhetorical strategy: it's common parlance, so employing it makes Trump seem more like a man of the people. But perhaps the President has also been reading about the analgesic benefits of profanity.