Web Results

healthyeating.sfgate.com/age-can-one-whey-protein-12175.html

Whey is a protein found in cow's milk products, and even breast milk. So, it's often safe for young children to eat whey protein if it's in age-appropriate foods. However, certain whey-containing foods and drinks are only safe for older children, teens and adults, and whey protein supplements should be used with caution.

www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/HealthAZ/HealthandWellness/PhysicalActivitySportsandFitness/Pages/Energy-drinks-whey-protein-and-more-Dietary-supplements-and-teen-athletes.aspx

Apr 4, 2014 ... Dietary supplements like caffeine, creatine, and ephedra are taken by many teenage athletes. Side effects, safety, quality, ... According to some studies, as many as 30 percent to 40 percent of young athletes take at least one dietary supplement such as creatine, protein or amino acids. In a competitive world ...

www.greatschools.org/gk/articles/dangerous-teen-trends

creatine. Studies indicate that as many as 40 percent of all young athletes take protein enhancements, which are available in forms ranging from bars to shakes to powders. While teens may take the supplement in order to improve muscle growth, muscle recovery, and overall athletic performance, there is no evidence that ...

abcnews.go.com/Health/teens-turn-protein-shakes-pump/story?id=17760126

Nov 19, 2012 ... Teens may be chugging protein shakes and taking other muscle-enhancing supplements more often than previously thought, researchers said. ... or shakes, use of steroids, or use of other muscle-building substances, such as creatine, amino acids, or growth hormones, considered "unhealthy" behaviors.

libres.uncg.edu/ir/uncg/f/M_Perko_Use_2012.pdf

Feb 2, 2012 ... report contends that many teenagers take creatine monohydrate because of its “ marketed effects” on athleticism and endurance (Azizi, 2010). However, they also stated that scientists have not made any clinical determination regarding the safety or efficacy of creatine. New Jersey has gone so far as to ban ...

www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/pages/AAP-Urges-Education-to-Prevent-Teen-Use-of-Performance-Enhancing-Substances.aspx

Jun 27, 2016 ... Reviews of multiple studies show that, while overall use of many substances has gone down, use remains prevalent in children and adolescents. Males are at higher risk than females for most performance-enhancing substances, such as protein powders, creatine and anabolic steroids. Girls report much ...

yourteenmag.com/health/physical-health/performance-enhancing-drugs

Jul 1, 2016 ... We asked two physicians to help us understand the health consequences for teenagers of using performance enhancing drugs. ... Weiss Kelly: Creatine is a naturally occurring substance in the body that is also sold as an over-the-counter supplement. ... Why do teens take performing-enhancing drugs?

educatedsportsparent.com/performance-enhancing-supplements

While not definitively proven, some studies on adults have suggested high doses of creatine may cause kidney damage or result in the body ceasing to make it's own creatine. A survey of teen athletes found that teens take higher doses than recommended during loading and maintenance phases of creatine use and ...

www.hihealth.com/blog/know-what-supplements-your-teenage-athletes-are-taking

Side effects include weight gain, abdominal discomfort including diarrhea, and bloating. Creatine use has been associated with the development of exertional compartment syndrome which has been on the rise. If your older teen athlete chooses to use creatine, limit it to 3.5 to 5gm/day and take a 1-2 week break every 4 ...