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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_v._Ohio

Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1 (1968), was a decision by the United States Supreme Court which held that the Fourth Amendment prohibition on unreasonable searches and seizures is not violated when a police officer stops a suspect on the street and frisks him or her without probable cause to arrest, if the police officer has a ...

www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/392/1

392 U.S. 1. Terry v. Ohio (No. 67). Argued: December 12, 1967. Decided: June 10, 1968. ___. Syllabus; Opinion, Warren; Concurrence, Harlan; Concurrence, White; Dissent, Fortas. Syllabus. A Cleveland detective (McFadden), on a downtown beat which he had been patrolling for many years, observed two strangers ...

www.oyez.org/cases/1967/67

Terry and two other men were observed by a plain clothes policeman in what the officer believed to be "casing a job, a stick-up." The officer stopped and frisked the three men, and found weapons on two of them. Terry was convicted of carrying a concealed weapon and sentenced to three years in jail.

www.casebriefs.com/blog/law/criminal-procedure/criminal-procedure-keyed-to-weinreb/the-fourth-amendment-arrest-and-search-and-seizure/terry-v-ohio-4

Citation. 392 U.S. 1, 88 S. Ct. 1868, 20 L. Ed. 2d 889 (1968). Brief Fact Summary. The Petitioner, John W. Terry (the “Petitioner”), was stopped and searched by an officer after the officer observed the Petitioner seemingly casing a store for a potential robbery. The officer approached the Petitioner for questioning and decided ...

www.acluohio.org/archives/cases/terry-v-ohio

On October 31, 1963 while on a routine beat through downtown Cleveland, Cleveland Police detective Martin McFadden with 39 years of police experience noticed three men acting suspiciously and pacing in front of a jewelry store on Euclid Avenue. Concerned the men were “casing a job, a stick up” and were carrying ...

www.britannica.com/event/Terry-v-Ohio

Terry v. Ohio, U.S. Supreme Court decision, issued on June 10, 1968, which held that police encounters known as stop-and-frisks, in which members of the public are stopped for questioning and patted down for weapons and drugs without probable cause, do not constitute a violation of the Fourth Amendment's prohibition ...

www.huffingtonpost.com/gunar-olsen/how-the-supreme-court-aut_b_9061838.html

Jan 25, 2016 ... The Supreme Court's first step to sanction racial profiling was Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1 (1968), an 8-1 ruling that developed the “reasonable suspicion” standard ( also known as the “stop-and-frisk” rule). The Court, whose opinion was delivered by the usually astute Chief Justice Earl Warren, held that the ...

legaldictionary.net/terry-v-ohio

Terry v. Ohio. Following is the case brief for Terry v. Ohio, Supreme Court of the United States, (1968). Case Summary of Terry v. Ohio. Three men, including Terry (defendant), were approached by an officer who had observed their alleged suspicious behavior. The officer suspected the men were planning to rob the store.

kids.laws.com/terry-v-ohio

The United States Supreme Court in Terry v. Ohio ruled in favor of the state, claiming that Officer McFadden's search was initiated from evidence and reasonable suspicion. The United States Supreme Court therefore ruled that Officer McFadden possessed probable cause; the court viewed the two men as being a threat to ...