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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Jones

United States v. Jones, 132 S.Ct. 945 (2012), was a United States Supreme Court case which held that installing a Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking device on a vehicle and using the device to monitor the vehicle's movements constitutes a search under the Fourth Amendment. In 2004 defendant Jones was ...

www.oyez.org/cases/2011/10-1259

Nov 8, 2011 ... Antoine Jones was arrested on Oct. 24, 2005, for drug possession after police attached a tracker to Jones's Jeep -- without judicial approval -- and used it to follow him for a month. A jury found Jones not guilty on all charges save for conspiracy, on which point jurors hung. District prosecutors, upset at the ...

www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/10-1259

It held the remaining data admissible, because “ '[a] person traveling in an automobile on public thoroughfares has no reasonable expectation of privacy in his movements from one place to another.' ” Ibid. (quoting United States v. Knotts, 460 U. S. 276, 281 (1983) ). Jones's trial in October 2006 produced a hung jury on the ...

www.scotusblog.com/case-files/cases/united-states-v-jones

Holding: Attaching a GPS device to a vehicle and then using the device to monitor the vehicle's movements constitutes a search under the Fourth Amendment. Plain English Holding: The defendant's conviction for drug trafficking must be reversed when some of the evidence to convict him was obtained through a GPS ...

supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/565/400

Jan 23, 2012 ... Respondent was convicted of drug trafficking and conspiracy charges. The District Court suppressed GPS data from a vehicle parked outside of respondent's residence, but held the remaining data admissible because respondent had no reasonable expectation of privacy when the vehicle was on a public ...

www.eff.org/cases/us-v-jones

In January 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously confirmed that Americans have constitutional protections against GPS surveillance by law enforcement, holding that GPS tracking is a "search" under the Fourth Amendment. In United States v. Jones (at times known as United States v. Maynard),...

www.casebriefsummary.com/united-states-v-jones

Nov 30, 2013 ... 132 S.Ct. 945 (2012). Facts. Respondent Jones was an owner and operator of a nightclub and came under suspicion of narcotics trafficking. Based on information gathered through various investigative techniques, police were granted a warrant authorizing use of a GPS tracking device on the Jeep ...

legaldictionary.net/united-states-v-jones

United States v. Jones Case Brief. Statement of the Facts: Police suspected Antoine Jones of engaging in drug-related crimes and applied for a warrant to place a global-positioning-system tracking device (GPS) on Jones's car. The warrant they obtained required it to be executed within 10 days in the District of Columbia.

www.quimbee.com/cases/united-states-v-jones--2

A summary and case brief of United States v. Jones, including the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, key terms, and concurrences and dissents.