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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Jones_(2012)

United States v. Jones, 132 S.Ct. 945 (2012), was a United States Supreme Court case which held that installing a Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking device on a vehicle and using the device to monitor the vehicle's movements constitutes a search under the Fourth Amendment. In 2004 defendant Jones was ...

www.oyez.org/cases/2011/10-1259

Nov 8, 2011 ... District prosecutors, upset at the loss, re-filed a single count of conspiracy against Jones and his business partner, Lawrence Maynard. Jones owned the "Levels" nightclub in the District of Columbia. Jones and Maynard were then convicted, but a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. ...

www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/10-1259

It held the remaining data admissible, because “ '[a] person traveling in an automobile on public thoroughfares has no reasonable expectation of privacy in his movements from one place to another.' ” Ibid. (quoting United States v. Knotts, 460 U. S. 276, 281 (1983) ). Jones's trial in October 2006 produced a hung jury on the ...

www.eff.org/cases/us-v-jones

In January 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously confirmed that Americans have constitutional protections against GPS surveillance by law enforcement, holding that GPS tracking is a "search" under the Fourth Amendment. In United States v. Jones (at times known as United States v....

www.scotusblog.com/case-files/cases/united-states-v-jones

Holding: Attaching a GPS device to a vehicle and then using the device to monitor the vehicle's movements constitutes a search under the Fourth Amendment. Plain English Holding: The defendant's conviction for drug trafficking must be reversed when some of the evidence to convict him was obtained through a GPS ...

supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/565/10-1259

Jan 23, 2012 ... Respondent was convicted of drug trafficking and conspiracy charges. The District Court suppressed GPS data from a vehicle parked outside of respondent's residence, but held the remaining data admissible because respondent had no reasonable expectation of privacy when the vehicle was on a public ...

www.casebriefsummary.com/united-states-v-jones

Nov 30, 2013 ... 132 S.Ct. 945 (2012). Facts. Respondent Jones was an owner and operator of a nightclub and came under suspicion of narcotics trafficking. Based on information gathered through various investigative techniques, police were granted a warrant authorizing use of a GPS tracking device on the Jeep ...

legaldictionary.net/united-states-v-jones

Jones. Following is the case brief for United States v. Jones, 132 S. Ct. 945 (2012 ). Case Summary of United States v. Jones: Police placed a GPS device on defendant's car without a ... United States, 389 U.S. 347 (1967), does not replace the trespass-based understanding of the Fourth Amendment, but rather adds to it.

www.quimbee.com/cases/united-states-v-jones--2

... suppressed only the data obtained while the vehicle was parked in a garage adjoining Jones's residence. Jones was convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment. The court of appeals reversed and held the warrantless use of the GPS device violated the Fourth Amendment. The U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari to ...