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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Fuji

Mount Fuji located on Honshu Island, is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776.24 m (12,389 ft). It is an active stratovolcano that last erupted in 1707–1708 , Mount Fuji lies about 100 kilometres (60 mi) south-west of Tokyo, and can be seen from there on a clear day. Mount Fuji's exceptionally symmetrical cone, which is ...

www.japan-talk.com/jt/new/mount-fuji

May 11, 2015 ... The massive volcano that towers over Japan. ... part of Japanese culture. Over the years, it has been featured in countless artworks, novels, plays, songs, movies, poems and legends. ... According to the legend, Mount Fuji's fires were ignited by an Emperor who was love sick over a girl from the moon.

volcano.oregonstate.edu/book/export/html/1023

Japan is a country steeped in myth and legend. Considering the country is 71% mountainous terrain, it is easy to understand why much of Japans' folklore concerns the mountains on the islands (2). Japan has 109 volcanoes, in differing states of activity (3). Mt. Fuji is also the highest and most venerated mountain in Japan, ...

www.ancient.eu/Mount_Fuji

Apr 12, 2017 ... Mt. Fuji, although generally envisaged as a single mountain, actually consists of three distinct volcanoes. Its classic symmetrical ... In the 15th century CE, a mythology developed which associated Mt. Fuji with Konohanasakuya-hime, the beautiful 'Flower-blossom Princess.' However, it is in the Shinto ...

www.sacred-destinations.com/japan/mount-fuji

History of Mount Fuji. Mount Fuji is a volcano, which geologists estimate was created 600,000 years ago during the Pleistocene era. It last erupted in 1707 and is now dormant. According to Buddhist tradition, Fuji rose from the earth in 286 BC after an earthquake that also created Lake Biwa (the largest lake in Japan).

www.ancientpages.com/2017/02/23/towering-sacred-mt-fuji-abode-of-the-immortals-in-ancient-japanese-beliefs

Feb 23, 2017 ... The present-day Mount Fuji is actually a combination of three successive volcanoes. The Japanese have long regarded certain mountains as objects of worship. They believed that mountains are sacred places where numerous gods reside. This belief still lives on and is continuously practiced in Japan.

guidable.co/culture/the-myths-and-facts-about-mount-fuji

Jun 29, 2017 ... Mt. Fuji is considered one of the famous mountains in the world, and the highest peak in Japan. It plays a vital role on the country's preserved culture and tradition, especially that of Shinto. Fuji-san is a stratovolcano, which means it is made of lava and ash, located at the Honshu Island, 60 miles south west ...

japanesemythology.wordpress.com/how-mt-fuji-got-its-snow-a-legend-of-asama-jinja

This account is excerpted from Mt Fuji and its religious traditions: "Asama Jinja in Studies in Shinto and Shrines (6 July 2013) by R.A.B. Ponsonby-Fane Less well- known than Chamberlin, Sansom, et al., Ponsonby-Fane wrote extensively on the history of Shinto shrines and their deities in the 1920's and 30's. In his entry for ...

www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Mount_fuji

Mount Fuji is surrounded by myths and legends concerning its spiritual significance and resident spirits and deities. Around 800 C.E. a shrine was built at the base of the mountain to placate the fire god that caused the volcano to erupt. In the eighth-century Kojiki, the Shinto goddess Konohana Sakuya Hime, “ the Goddess of ...