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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yawn

Guttmann and Dopart determined that a yawn causes one of three possible situations to occur: the brain cools down due to an influx or outflux of oxygen, the pressure in the brain is reduced by an outflux of oxygen, or the pressure of the brain is increased by an influx of air caused by ...

www.healthline.com/symptom/excessive-yawning

Feb 29, 2016 ... Yawning is a mostly involuntary process of opening the mouth and breathing in deeply, filling the lungs with air. It is a very natural response to being tired. In fact, yawning is usually triggered by sleepiness or fatigue. Some yawns are short,...

www.healthline.com/health/why-do-we-yawn

Causes of yawning, even if you're not tired. The most scientifically backed theory about why we yawn is brain temperature regulation. A 2014 study published in Physiology & Behavior looked at the yawning habits of 120 people and found that yawning occurred less during the winter. If the brain's ...

www.webmd.com/brain/news/20110923/why-we-yawn

Sep 23, 2011 ... People yawn more easily in cooler temperatures, supporting the idea that yawning cools the brain.

www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/10/facts-yawning-why-we-yawn-contagious_n_3398301.html

Jun 10, 2013 ... The most recent research on yawning suggests that it exists to cool down the brain. That open-mouthed yawn causes sinus walls “to expand and contract like a bellows, pumping air onto the brain, which lowers its temperature,” National Geographic reported. The study found that people were more likely to ...

www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318414.php

Yawning may be a function of breathing. Yawns may be more likely when the blood needs oxygen. A yawn causes a big intake of air and a faster heartbeat, which could theoretically mean that it is pumping more oxygen through the body. So a yawn may be ...

science.howstuffworks.com/life/inside-the-mind/human-brain/question572.htm

So what's behind this mysterious epidemic of yawning? First, let's look at what this bodily motion is: Yawning is an involuntary action that causes us to open our mouths wide and breathe in deeply. We know it's involuntary because we do it even before we're born: According to Robert Provine, a developmental neuroscientist ...

medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003096.htm

Jan 26, 2017 ... Drowsiness or weariness; Disorders associated with excessive daytime sleepiness; Vasovagal reaction (stimulation of a nerve called the vagus nerve), caused by heart attack or aortic dissection; Brain problems such as tumor, stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis; Certain medicines (rare); Problem with the ...

www.psychologytoday.com/blog/brain-sense/201111/why-do-you-yawn-when-youre-not-sleepy

Nov 16, 2011 ... But boredom isn't the only yawn factor. If someone you're conversing with yawns, chances are, you will too. "Yawning is extraordinarily contagious," says Robert Provine, a pioneer of yawning research. "Seeing a person yawn triggers yawns. Reading about yawning causes yawns. Sitting in a room thinking ...