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airandspace.si.edu/stories/editorial/how-kites-fly

Apr 26, 2012 ... Check out the video of this national champion indoor kite flyer from the family day . There obviously wasn't any wind inside, so how was he able to fly kites in the middle of the Space Race gallery? The kite flyers create lift, drag, and thrust with various walking patterns, arm movements, and spinning to make ...

www.batchelors.net/kites-in-the-classroom/9-kites-a-guide-for-students.html

A kite is a special sort of aircraft, attached to the ground by a string. When a kite is stopped from being blown backwards by the wind it will usually fly. The string we hold when flying a kite is what is used to stop the kite from flying away with the wind. Because this sort of aircraft has no engine it needs something else to make  ...

www.my-best-kite.com/how-does-a-kite-fly.html

21 hours ago ... The MBK Simple Delta - simple to make and fly. This page starts out a bit like a high-school science lesson. However, it soon moves on to some interesting real- world situations which also relate to the question 'how does a kite fly'. Check out the book Kite Physics on Amazon, for a more in-depth look at kite ...

www.skratch-pad.com/kites/fly.html

The lifting force of all kites is produced by deflecting the air downward, the resulting change in momentum producing an upward force. The reason for this is that the air traveling over the top of the curved surface of the kite is going faster than the air passing underneath. Fast-moving air creates less pressure; this means there ...

www.my-best-kite.com/simple-explanation-for-how-kites-fly.html

As the kite rises on its string, the kite's angle to the wind gets smaller. The nose comes down and the tail comes up, until the kite is at a much smaller angle to the wind than when it started. This causes the upward push on the kite to get smaller too. When the upward push is equal to the downward pull of the kite's weight plus  ...

www.gombergkites.com/nkm/why.html

Kite Science Why a Kite Flys. LIFT, DRAG, AND GRAVITY: A kite and airplanes are heavier-than-air object that are flown by the lift created by air in motion over their wings. An airplane relies on thrust from its engines. A kite is tethered in place and needs moving air (wind) to fly. There are many possible kite shapes. Each of ...

www.kites.co.nz/pdffiles/What%20makes%20a%20kite%20fly.pdf

A kite lifts when wind pressure being deflected along the face of the kite pushes the kite up into the sky. If the wind is removed, the kite will fall. At the same time, wind passing over the top of the kite creates an area of low pressure, like a vacuum, along the back of the kite. This creates a pull from behind. A kite is effected by ...

www.real-world-physics-problems.com/physics-of-kite-flying.html

The physics of kite flying, and aerodynamic lift. ... airborne kite. Source: http:// www.flickr.com/photos/poissant/499841238. The Physics Of Kite Flying – Aerodynamic Lift Kite flying is a fun activity which people of all ages can enjoy. All you have to do is go ... Kites for Everyone: How to Make and Fly Them. $13.68 $14.95.

www.scientificamerican.com/article/bring-science-home-kite-tails

Aug 23, 2012 ... How does a kite fly? As someone runs with a kite, the wind going head-on into the kite causes a lift force on it. This force is perpendicular to the wind, pushing the kite up. At the same time, the force of drag pulls the kite back, in the direction that the wind is going. There are many different kite designs.