en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Folklore

Folklore by ethnicity (11 C, 3 P). ▻ Folklore by country (88 C, 19 P). ▻ Folklore by region (9 C, 10 P) ... R. ▻ Recurring elements in folklore (16 C, 4 P) ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fairy_tales

Fairy tales are stories that range from those originating in folklore to more modern stories defined as literary fairy tales. Despite subtle differences in the categorizing of fairy tales, folklore, fables, myths, and legends, a modern ...... Half- Man, 1956, French, Paul Delarue, The Borzoi Book of French Folk-Tales. The Harper, 1989 ...

www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts2.html

Folktales of type 981 and other legends about geronticide. Why People Today ... P. The Panchatantra. Tales from ancient India. The Enchanted Brahman's Son.

www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts.html

The aliens in these legends are not men from outer space but the .... A collection of legends reflecting anti-Jewish sentiment among European Christians. These ...

teacher.scholastic.com/writewit/mff/myths.htm

Discover the stories and traditions of cultures across the globe as you read myths from the world regions listed here. ... Myths, Folktales and Fairy Tales home

www.americanfolklore.net/sindex.html

Dec 12, 2014 ... Retellings of American folktales and legends, Native American myths, weather ... Paul Bunyan finds a little blue ox the Winter of the Blue Snow.

www2.nkfust.edu.tw/~emchen/CLit/folk_lit_type_folktale.htm

Folktales are stories that grew out of the lives and imaginations of the people, or folk. ... of man's existence” (cited in Lüthi, 1976, Once Upon a Time: On the Nature of Fairy Tales, p. 70) ... They play significant roles in early stories and legends.

georgiasouthern.libguides.com/c.php?g=838319&p=5987833

Jun 14, 2018 ... Examples: Paul Bunyan, Pecos Bill. ... This folklore site contains retellings of folktales, myths, legends, fairy tales, superstitions, weatherlore, ...

muse.jhu.edu/article/249218

Folktales of India. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1987. xxxi + 357 p. Rev. David Shulman, Journal of American Folklore 102.405 (July-Sept 1989): 345-47.