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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biogeochemical_cycle

In Earth science, a biogeochemical cycle or substance turnover is a pathway by which a chemical substance moves through both the biotic (biosphere) and ...

www.yourarticlelibrary.com/environment/ecosystem/4-common-biogeochemical-cycles-explained-with-diagram/28229

Some of the major biogeochemical cycles are as follows: (1) Water Cycle or Hydrologic Cycle (2) Carbon-Cycle (3) Nitrogen Cycle (4) Oxygen Cycle.

www.dummies.com/education/science/discovering-the-biogeochemical-cycles

... and the process by which organic matter returns to the chemical elements in the earth is explained by the chemical part. There are four biogeochemical cycles , ...

www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Biogeochemical_cycle

In ecology, a biogeochemical cycle is a circuit or pathway by which a chemical element or .... The cycle is usually discussed as four main reservoirs of carbon ...

www.reference.com/science/four-biogeochemical-cycles-5ecc4d7f783824ba

The four biogeochemical cycles include the water cycle, the carbon cycle, the phosphorous cycle and the nitrogen cycle. These four cycles involve biology, ...

www.colorado.edu/GeolSci/courses/GEOL1070/chap04/chapter4.html

Biogeochemical Cycles. Chapter 4. All matter cycles...it is neither created nor destroyed... As the Earth is essentially a closed system with respect to matter, we  ...

www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/Assets/Nemo/documents/lessons/Lesson_4/Lesson_4-Teacher's_Guide.pdf

Lesson 4: The Biogeochemical Cycle. Overview. Lesson 4 introduces the concept of biogeochemical cycles, emphasizing the mechanisms by which elements ...

www.quora.com/What-are-the-four-most-important-biogeochemical-cycles

Biochemical cycles are basically of two types: a) Gaseous cycles like carbon (as carbon dioxide), oxygen, nitrogen, etc. b) Sedimentary cycles like sulphur, ...

www.britannica.com/science/biogeochemical-cycle

biogeochemical cycle: Any of the natural pathways by which essential ... In order for the living components of a major ecosystem (e.g., a lake or a forest) to ...